Monthly Archives: January 2018

Saving the Unborn

“It would be 11 years before a president of the United States, Ronald Reagan, spoke up in defense of unborn babies.” James Dobson

“We come now to our day and to the president who may turn out to be the most pro-life chief executive of them all—Donald Trump.” Ibid

Editor’s note: President Trump has agreed to speak at the 2018 March for Life in Washington, DC

For those interested in helping fund Dr. Dobson’s Family Talk program his address is 540 Elkton Drive, Colorado Springs, CO 80907

dr.-dobson's-january-newsletter-2

Dear Friends,

A new year has begun, and with it comes a national remembrance marked by sorrow and shame. On January 22, 1973, the Supreme Court handed down two rulings that would change our country, and the world, forever. I’ll never forget that day. At that time, I was a professor at the University of Southern California School of Medicine, and I had spent the day on campus. I was driving home and listening to the radio when I heard a tragic announcement. Those two decisions were Roe v. Wade and Doe v. Bolton. Seven justices had voted to legalize abortion throughout nine months of pregnancy, for any reason (or for no reason). America had declared war on its unborn babies and vulnerable mothers. Now, 45 years later, more than 58 million preborn babies have been murdered in hospitals and clinics all over the country.

My father and I grieved that night over this brutal assault on human life. The following Sunday morning, Shirley and I waited to see what our pastor would say from the pulpit. He was a good man and a great minister, but he was silent on that day. Most of Protestant America reacted with the same disinterest. It was a non-issue in most churches. The exception was the Catholic leadership, which understood the significance of the Supreme Court’s decisions. Many of its priests spoke out against the carnage. Continue reading

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Meet Bandy Lee

“It is this woman who is mentally ill.” Patricia McCarthy

Physician, heal thyself: It’s Bandy Lee who’s non compos mentis

By Patricia McCarthy,  American Thinker, January 12, 2018

Bandy-X.Lee-in-BerkeleyIn recent weeks, Bandy X. Lee, a pseudo-psychiatrist, astonishingly employed by Yale, has been going around telling everyone who will listen that Trump is mentally ill, dangerously so, and that he must be removed from office.

The Democrats are all atwitter.  They hang on her every word.  They do not care that she is acting and speaking in complete violation of her profession.  As any professional in mental health knows, it is absolutely unethical to diagnose a person one has never met or spoken to, let alone interviewed or examined.

It is this woman who is mentally ill.  She continues to speak out in spite of being warned by the American Psychiatric Association that her public comments are unethical. “We at the APA call for an end to psychiatrists providing professional opinions in the media about public figures whom they have not examined, whether it be on cable news appearances, books, or in social media,” wrote the APA, without mentioning Lee specifically.  “Arm[]chair psychiatry or the use of psychiatry as a political tool is the misuse of psychiatry and is unacceptable and unethical.”

Dr. Lee is not even licensed to practice in Connecticut; her license expired in 2015.  Nevertheless, she has assembled a book with essays by similarly unethical psychiatrists and mental health professionals who cannot accept Trump as president.  This is the stuff of bad reality television, like Jerry Springer or Oprah, the snake oil saleswoman of our century.

The left has not yet tired of its campaign to get Trump out of office, begun on November 9, 2016.  The devastated Clinton campaign, unable to accept its loss, fabricated the Russia collusion meme.  As that falls apart, the leftists have moved on to their “Trump is mentally impaired” scheme.  They keep invoking the 25th Amendment.  Clearly, not one of them has actually read it.  There is not a chance in Hell that they will remove Trump from office this way.  Continue reading

The Frankfurt School

“Orthodox Marxists and Marxist Leninists from the 1920s on vigorously denounced the Frankfurt School and its exponents as social decadents posing as Marxist revolutionaries.” Paul Gottfried

The Frankfurt School and Cultural Marxism

Paul Gottfried, American Thinker, January 12, 2018

Franklin Einspruch, A commentator in The Federalist, describes me as a “circumspect conservative” scholar who has written responsibly about Cultural Marxism.  I’m also deemed to be a conservative who agrees with other conservative critics of the Frankfurt School on the harmful effects of this group’s radical ideas. But I must part ways with Mr. Einspruch when he tells us:  “It’s plain fact that political correctness and multiculturalism derive from notions hailing from the Frankfurt School, which in turn took most of its cues from Karl Marx.” Although I can discern a connection between feminist attacks on inherited gender roles and Frankfurt School views on sexual liberation, I’d have to question whether the present war against Christian, bourgeois institutions can be traced back in any meaningful way to traditional Marxism.

Theodor Adorno, Max Horkheimer (my teacher), Herbert Marcuse and other members of the Frankfurt School in interwar Germany worked to fuse Marx’s theory of class struggle and the contradictions of capitalism with a Freudian-based vision of erotic pleasure. In this remarkable fusion, it is hard, at least for me, to recognize Marx’s socioeconomic critique. Marx was concerned about man’s alienation from his own work as a result of productive forces over which he had no control. The father of “scientific socialism” never focused on abetting sexual revolt or fighting the emotional repression created by sharp gender distinctions or the failure to give proper social recognition to homosexuals.          Orthodox Marxists and Marxist Leninists from the 1920s on vigorously denounced the Frankfurt School and its exponents as social decadents posing as Marxist revolutionaries. Communist regimes would later engage in similar attacks on representatives and sympathizers of the Frankfurt school, such as the Hungarian radical literary figure Georg Lukacs. Continue reading

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