Monthly Archives: September 2017

Reading, Riting, Rithmatic

“Many college kids can hardly write a proper English sentence, never mind a proper essay.” Bruce Price

“Recent studies show that English teachers know little about the language they’re supposed to teach.” Ibid

“I am about a decade into my teaching career, but even within this fairly short span, I have noticed a startling decline in the quality of written work turned in by my students, regardless of which institution (community college, private four-year school) the papers are coming from.” Ibid

Bruce Deitrick Price, American Thinker, September 18, 2017

Many college kids can hardly write a proper English sentence, never mind a proper essay.  Meanwhile, the essay-writing industry is huge, churning out tens of thousands of illegal documents.  Naturally, all participants in the scam pretend there’s no scam, and so the scam can go on.

Here’s a recent, terrifying report from an editor:

My organization decided a few weeks back that we needed to hire a new professional staff person.  We had close to 500 applicants. Inasmuch as the task was to help us communicate information related to the work we do, we gave each of the candidates one of the reports we published last year and asked them to produce a one-page summary.  All were college graduates.  Only one could produce a satisfactory summary.  That person got the job.

Here is a good indication of how bad things already were 40 years ago.  One investigator concluded:

If you think America’s English teachers have gone “back to basics” and are solving the literacy problem everyone began shouting about in the 1970s, think again. Recent studies show that English teachers know little about the language they’re supposed to teach. They get poor training in writing at college and, as a group, are bad writers.

professor recently reported: Continue reading

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Jupiter’s Hurricane

Jupiter-GRS-hubble-580x363“One of the defining characteristics of Jupiter is its Great Red Spot. It’s believed to be a massive hurricane, two to three times larger than Planet Earth, with wind speeds making Irma look like a summer breeze—over 400 miles per hour. It’s not transient like our hurricanes. This storm was first recorded in 1831, but it may have been discovered as far back as 1665.” Brian C. Joondeph

Now Here’s a Real Hurricane

Brian C. Joondeph, American Thinker, September 10, 2017

When it rains, it pours.  And blows.  Hurricane season is in full swing: first Harvey, now Irma.  Jose is lurking in the Caribbean.  Others are incubating off the western coast of Africa.

Hurricanes are nothing new, including massive storms like Irma bearing down on Florida.  Here is a list of super-storms dating back to the time of Columbus.  This is long before gas-guzzling cars, air conditioners, carbon footprints, and Trump supporters.

Hurricanes are part of weather, impossible to accurately predict, as there are too many variables with interactions we don’t fully understand.  Weather is part of our climate system.  Climate can’t be predicted with any accuracy.  As the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate change notes, “[t]he climate system is a coupled non-linear chaotic system, and therefore the long-term prediction of future climate states is not possible.”

What if we looked beyond Planet Earth for some guidance on hurricanes?  Let’s not look in some faraway Star Wars galaxy, but closer to home on Jupiter.  Jupiter is a mysterious planet covered in clouds, and far larger than Earth – so big that 1,300 Earths could fit inside.  One of the defining characteristics of Jupiter is its Great Red Spot. Continue reading

Jupiter’s Hurricane

151014113612-new-portrait-jupiter-orig-00000222-super-tease“One of the defining characteristics of Jupiter is its Great Red Spot. It’s believed to be a massive hurricane, two to three times larger than Planet Earth, with wind speeds making Irma look like a summer breeze—over 400 miles per hour. It’s not transient like our hurricanes. This storm was first recorded in 1831, but it may have been discovered as far back as 1665.” Brian C. Joondeph

Now Here’s a Real Hurricane

Brian C. Joondeph, American Thinker, September 10, 2017

When it rains, it pours.  And blows.  Hurricane season is in full swing: first Harvey, now Irma.  Jose is lurking in the Caribbean.  Others are incubating off the western coast of Africa.

Hurricanes are nothing new, including massive storms like Irma bearing down on Florida.  Here is a list of super-storms dating back to the time of Columbus.  This is long before gas-guzzling cars, air conditioners, carbon footprints, and Trump supporters.

Hurricanes are part of weather, impossible to accurately predict, as there are too many variables with interactions we don’t fully understand.  Weather is part of our climate system.  Climate can’t be predicted with any accuracy.  As the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate change notes, “[t]he climate system is a coupled non-linear chaotic system, and therefore the long-term prediction of future climate states is not possible.”

What if we looked beyond Planet Earth for some guidance on hurricanes?  Let’s not look in some faraway Star Wars galaxy, but closer to home on Jupiter.  Jupiter is a mysterious planet covered in clouds, and far larger than Earth – so big that 1,300 Earths could fit inside.  One of the defining characteristics of Jupiter is its Great Red Spot. Continue reading

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