More Ice!

“It may not be comparable to Gilligan’s Island, but the plight of the 74 members of the Australasian Antarctic Expedition, aboard a research ship stuck in 2013-12-10T020644Z_1_CBRE9B905VC00_RTROPTP_4_ANTARCTIC-ENVIRONMENT-e1386955629697ice for more than a week at the bottom of the world, appeared anything but grim as 2014 approached.

“It was not all fun and games aboard the Russian-flagged MV Akademik Shokalskly.  After bad weather led the crew of the Australian icebreaker Aurora Australis to suspend efforts to reach the expedition Monday, less than 10 nautical miles short of its goal, more than two dozen of those aboard the research vessel ventured onto the surrounding ice, locked arms and proceeded to stomp on the snow to make a spot where a helicopter from the Chinese icebreaker Xue Long, or Snow Dragon, can land.

“The helicopter, which can carry 12 people at a time, is expected to take the ship’s. 52 passengers—including the research team and journalists—to the Xue Long.”  Tom Watkins and Ralph Ellis, CNN World, December 31, 2013

“According to an 1887 newspaper article entitled ‘Variations in Climate,’ Scandinavian Vikings were able to sail through the Arctic Ocean and establish colonies in the ‘highest north latitude’ of Greenland and North American centuries before the arrival of Christopher Columbus.

“’Remains of those upper Arctic villages are found, I may say, in each Arctic expedition.  The climate of Iceland becoming more and cooler also proves that the state of the earth varies in the course of centuries,’ Beck continued.  Jim Vanne

Variations in Climate

 jvanne@ameritech.net, December 19, 2013

According to an 1887 newspaper article (see http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=d&cl=search&d=CHP18871108.2.35&srpos=133&e=——-100–101—-0glaciers+melting) entitled “Variations in Climate,” Scandinavian Vikings were able to sail through the Arctic Ocean and establish colonies in the “highest north latitude” of Greenland and North America centuries before the arrival of Christopher Columbus. These colonies, however, were abandoned by the Vikings due to “the increasing cold.” “On the contrary, the formation of ice increases annually if the winters are strongly cold, long and dark,” wrote Alexander Beck in 1887. “The reverse of that state of things is found by calculations for the year 1122 A.D., and it is precisely at that time we find the Danes and other Scandinavian nations going through the Arctic open seas.”

“Colonies are established by them in the highest north latitude of Greenland, and the upper part of North America, a long time before Christopher Columbus had reached a more southern part of the same continent,” Beck added. “But those colonies were relinquished on accounts of the increasing cold. In the fourteenth century the seas are found again closed, even in the summer. The great north icefield … increases daily, the Arctic colonists are compelled to come more to the south, and the cold takes possession again of countries which were kept free for a few years just about the twelfth century.”

“Remains of those upper Arctic villages are found, I may say, in each Arctic expedition. The climate of Iceland becoming more and more cool also proves that the state of the earth varies in the course of centuries,” Beck continued.

The warm climate that defined the Middle Ages and allowed the Vikings to settle the most northern reaches of the Americas is known as the “Medieval Warming Period,” which lasted from the 9th century A.D. to the 13th Century A.D. During this time temperatures were warmer in the Northern Hemisphere than the so-called “Little Ice Age” that followed, according to the National Climate Data Centers.

Read more: http://dailycaller.com/2013/12/18/vikings-could-navigate-colonize-the-arctic-during-medieval-times/

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