Socialized Medicine USA

“Communist Part USA Number two man, Jarvis Tyner, has been criss-crossing America, rallying party members, converting wavering Democrats and building gm09082620090825115653support for Democratic Presidential candidate, US Senator Barack Obama (D-IL).

“Jarvis Tyner was inspired in his radical activities in the ‘60s by communist singer and activist Paul Robeson.  Robeson had, in the mid-‘40s, helped persuade a prominent poet (and secret communist), Frank Marshall Davis, to move from Chicago to Hawaii.  In the late ‘70s, the poet became a mentor to a young man sent to High School in Hawaii from his home in Indonesia.  The question is—to what extent did Frank Marshall Davis inspire the young Barack Obama?” Trevor Loudon, Barack Obama And The Enemies Within, p. 72, 74

And communist-line it was. Frank [Marshall Davis] shared the [Chicago] Star’s spotlight with a number of notable Reds.  Top contributors included pro-Soviet reporter Johannes Steel and an op-ed-page trio of Frank, Howard Fast, and Claude Pepper.

“Fast was a well-known Hollywood writer and novelist.  In 1953, he would be feted with the Bolsheviks’ illustrious Stalin Prize, an honor he shared with Paul Robeson (1952 winner).  Fast wrote for every issue of the Star and had top billing with his ‘State of the Nation’ column.

“Featured alongside Frank and Fast was America’s most left-leaning U.S. Senator, Florida’s Claude ‘Red’ Pepper.

“Ironically, it was precisely at this time that Pepper, in addition to writing for the Star [Chicago’s Communist newspaper], also wrote legislation to implement socialized medicine in America.  He was the Senate’s leading such advocate, a man against whom the American Medical Association was embroiled in what members described as a ‘terrific fight’ to stop a federal takeover of health care.  Pepper had a powerful perch to enact change; he was chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Wartime Health and Education.

“That information was well-known, but what few knew at the time was the supporting role played by Pepper’s chief of staff, Charles Kramer.

“Kramer was born Charles Krivitsky in New York in 1906.  In 1933, he was hired as an economist by FDR’s Agricultural Adjustment Administration, a magnet for collectivists and central planners.  That same year, Kramer secretly joined CPUSA.  The Soviets quickly began recruiting him, and by the end of World War II, Kramer was working for the KGB [Soviet Secret Police] .

“As he worked for Senator Pepper, Charles Kramer, official Soviet agent, secretly handed over important information to the USSR. His code name, believe it or not, was ‘Mole.’  His transgressions were so serious that on May 31, 1946, FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover personally wrote a letter directly to President Truman on Kramer, highlighting him ‘as a known Soviet espionage agent operating within the U.S. Government,’ who had been unusually influential in Pepper’s work, from foreign policy to domestic policy.  According to Herb Romerstein, Kramer, as staff director of Pepper’s subcommittee, wrote the bill to establish a National Health Program—socialized medicine.

“When subpoenaed by the FBI and House Committee on Un-American Activities, Kramer refused to answer questions.  He had learned well what to do in the face of such accusations: denounce your accusers as Red-baiting lunatics and declare yourself a ‘progressive.’  When the Chicago Star was up and  running, Kramer and his boss, Senator Pepper, proclaimed themselves to be Henry Wallace ‘progressives.’

“Such were Claude Pepper’s unique connections while writing for Frank’s [Davis] Chicago Star.”  Paul Kengor, The Communist: Frank Marshall Davis: The Untold Story of Barack Obama’s Mentor, pp. 121, 122.

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