HIV

“About 47,000 new diagnoses of HIV made each year, with a lifetime cost for each person conservatively estimated at $379,668.”  Kurt Williamsenimages

“There are also 19 million new infections of sexually transmitted gonorrhea, Chlamydia, and syphilis yearly, which cost $17 billion to treat each year.”  Ibid.

“The World Health Organization says that there ‘are more than 30 different sexually transmissible bacteria, viruses and parasites.’ Treatment for those in the United States is also in the billions of dollars per year—when they’re treatable and not drug resistant.”  Ibid.

The High Cost of “Hooking Up”

By Kurt Williamsen, The New American, January 7, 2013, p. 11

Hydeia Broadbent became somewhat of a mini-celebrity 20 years ago as a seven-year-old when she appeared on a Nickelodeon AIDS special. She appeared on the show with basketball great and HIV-positive athlete Magic Johnson — she had been diagnosed with AIDS, basically believed at the time to be a death sentence. She is still alive, and is a public-speaking dynamo. As an early recipient of anti-viral treatments that made AIDS a livable disease, one might expect her to be one of the many who reiterate their positive experienceshaving the disease, also inadvertently pooh-poohing the seriousness of the disease.
Not her. She does the opposite. She lays bare the consequences of having the disease, in order to encourage people to abstain from behaviors that might lead them to acquire it. She explained in a story for CNN: “If you’re HIV-negative, I would say ‘Stay that way.’ If you’re positive, I would say, ‘There’s life after a positive test, but it is a hassle.’”
As she told CNN last year, what she accomplishes in a day depends on how she feels:

There are days when Hydeia can’t get out of bed. Sometimes she is so sick her mornings are spent with her head hung over the toilet.

Every morning, she must take her cocktail of five pills. Her tiny frame is partly a result of medicine stunting her growth.

If it’s a good day, she goes to the gym to exercise. Staying fit is key to living with AIDS, she says. She eats healthy too, because a person with HIV/AIDS is more prone to cancer and heart disease….

“There’s so much misinformation. People think there’s a cure … ,” she said. “There is no cure.” …

Although a positive test result is no longer a death sentence, Hydeia says, “it’s a life sentence.”

“It’s always there. You’re always going to have HIV or AIDS. You’re always going to be taking medicine. You’re always going to be going to the doctor’s office. You’re always going to be getting your blood drawn.”

Her medicine costs $3,500 to $5,000 a month.

The story soberly added that “16,000 Americans will die this year from AIDS.”

Yet despite the very harsh realities of HIV/AIDS, according to the National Center for Health Statistics, in 2010, in the United States, “for all races combined in the age group 15-24 years, HIV disease moved from the 12th leading cause of death in 2009 to the 11th leading cause of death in 2010.” It is the “7th leading cause of death in 2010 for the age group 25-44 years.”

Moreover, there are, according to the Centers for Disease Control’s “2010 Sexually Transmitted Diseases Surveillance,” about47,000 new diagnoses of HIV made each year, with a lifetime cost for each person conservatively estimated at $379,668 — that’s $17,844,396,000 of medical costs added to an already overwhelmed and over-budgeted U.S. medical system yearly. (Note: Many people catch HIV by sharing intravenous needles, not via sex.)

There are also 19 million new infections of sexually transmitted gonorrhea, chlamydia, and syphilis yearly, which cost $17 billion to treat each year. Then there are the costs to treat all of the other STDs — human papillomavirus, herpes, genital warts, hepatitis, trichomoniasis, scabies, etc. The World Health Organization says that there “are more than 30 different sexually transmissiblebacteria, viruses and parasites.” Treatment for those in the United States is also in the billions of dollars per year — when they’re treatable and not drug resistant.

Whooping It Up Over Whooppee

Though it’s likely that literally everyone who is having sex is aware of STDs, such as herpes and HIV, and that STDs have consequences that include death, casual sex in our country is practically revered by youths and leftists. Sex on a whim, to them, is the be-all and end-all of life.

Accordingly, public schools, Hollywood celebs, and teen magazines often teach youths that no one should be allowed to tell them that they should not have sex until they are married, that every type and manner of sex is OK, and that having sex is just another bodily function and should be considered only with the same level of care as eating: Be careful about what you put in your body; try to prevent the transmission of pathogens via hygienic practices and barriers to disease transmission, such as latex products; and then dig in.

As well, even network TV tantalizes viewers with titillation and works to convince viewers that bed hopping is no big deal — everyone does it, with ones they love or ones they merely like. The term “friends with benefits” — friends who have sex with each other when no one better is available — is now such common slang that Hollywood used it as the basis for a movie.

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