Monthly Archives: November 2012

Plymouth Plantation

“The women now went willingly into the field, and took their little ones with them to set corn; which before would allege weakness and inability; whom to have compelled would have been thought great tyranny and oppression.

“The experience that was had in this common course and condition, tried sundry years and that amongst godly and sober men, may well evince the vanity of that conceit of Plato’s and other ancients applauded by some of later times; and that the taking away of property and bringing in community into a commonwealth would make them happy and flourishing; as if they were wiser than God.”  William Bradford, The History of Plymouth Plantation

The Desolate Wilderness

The Wall Street Journal, November 21, 2012

Here beginneth the chronicle of those memorable circumstances of the year 1620, as recorded by Nathaniel Morton , keeper of the records of Plymouth Colony, based on the account of William Bradford , sometime governor thereof:

So they left that goodly and pleasant city of Leyden, which had been their resting-place for above eleven years, but they knew that they were pilgrims and imagestrangers here below, and looked not much on these things, but lifted up their eyes to Heaven, their dearest country, where God hath prepared for them a city (Heb. XI, 16), and therein quieted their spirits.

When they came to Delfs-Haven they found the ship and all things ready, and such of their friends as could not come with them followed after them, and sundry came from Amsterdam to see them shipt, and to take their leaves of them. One night was spent with little sleep with the most, but with friendly entertainment and Christian discourse, and other real expressions of true Christian love.

The next day they went on board, and their friends with them, where truly doleful was the sight of that sad and mournful parting, to hear what sighs and sobs and prayers did sound amongst them; what tears did gush from every eye, and pithy speeches pierced each other’s heart, that sundry of the Dutch strangers that stood on the Key as spectators could not refrain from tears. But the tide (which stays for no man) calling them away, that were thus loath to depart, their Reverend Pastor, falling down on his knees, and they all with him, with watery cheeks commended them with the most fervent prayers unto the Lord and His blessing; and then with mutual embraces and many tears they took their leaves one of another, which proved to be the last leave to many of them.

Being now passed the vast ocean, and a sea of troubles before them in expectations, they had now no friends to welcome them, no inns to entertain or refresh them, no houses, or much less towns, to repair unto to seek for succour; and for the season it was winter, and they that know the winters of the country know them to be sharp and violent, subject to cruel and fierce storms, dangerous to travel to known places, much more to search unknown coasts.

Besides, what could they see but a hideous and desolate wilderness, full of wilde beasts and wilde men? and what multitudes of them there were, they then knew not: for which way soever they turned their eyes (save upward to Heaven) they could have but little solace or content in respect of any outward object; for summer being ended, all things stand in appearance with a weatherbeaten face, and the whole country, full of woods and thickets, represented a wild and savage hew.

If they looked behind them, there was a mighty ocean which they had passed, and was now as a main bar or gulph to separate them from all the civil parts of the world.

A version of this article appeared November 21, 2012, on page A16 in the U.S. edition of The Wall Street Journal, with the headline: The Desolate Wilderness.

 

Thanksgiving 1789

By Melanie Kirkpatrick – The Wall Street Journal – November 21, 2012,  p. A15

It is hard to imagine America’s favorite holiday as a source of political controversy. But that was the case in 1789, the year of our first Thanksgiving as a nation. The controversy began on Sept. 25 in New York City, then the seat of government. The inaugural session of thfrsfirst Congress was about to recess when Rep. Elias Boudinot of New Jersey rose to introduce a resolution. He asked the House to create a joint committee with the Senate to “wait upon the President of the United States, to request that he would recom­mend to the people of the United States a day of public thanks­giving and~prayer to be observed by acknowledging, with grateful hearts, the many signal favors of Almighty God.”

The congressman made special reference to . the Constitution, which had been ratified by the requisite two-thirds of the states in 1788. A day of public thanks­giving, he believed, would allow Americans to express gratitude to God for the “opportunity peace­ably to establish a Constitution of government for their safety and happiness.”

Boudinot’s resolution sparked a vigorous debate. Rep. Aedanus Burke of South Carolina objected on the grounds that a Thanksgiv­ing was too European. He “did not like this mimicking of Euro­pean customs, where they made a mere mockery of thanksgivings.” Rep. Thomas Tudor Tucker, also of South Carolina, raised two further objections. Why should the President direct the people to do, perhaps, what they have no mind to do?” he asked. “If a day of thanksgiving must take place,” he said, “let it be done by the authority of the several States.” Tucker’s second reservation had to do with separation of church and state. Proclaiming a day of Thanksgiving “is a reli­gious matter,” he said, “and, as such, proscribed to us.” The Bill of Rights would not be ratified until 1791—but Congress had just approved the wording of First Amendment, and that debate was fresh in everyone’s mind. Continue reading

Radical Valerie Jarrett

“Valerie Jarrett’s major area of expertise has been to help President Obama ‘fundamentally transform’ the United States into a socialist paradise.”  John Perazzo

“In 1983 Valerie Jarrett married the son of Vernon Jarrett, a black journalist who formerly wrote for the communist0influenced Chicago Defender.  In the 1940s, Mr. Jarrett was a leader of the Chicago chapter of American Youth for Democracy—youth wing of the Communist Party USA.”  Ibid.

Valerie Jarrett’s Radical Roots

By John Perazzo – FrontPageMag.Com – November 14, 2012

It was recently revealed that for several months, President Obama’s closest and most trusted advisor, Valerie Jarrett, has been leading secret negotiations with representatives of Iran’s Supreme Leader, Ali Khamenei, in an effort to develop normalized relations between the U.S. and Iran. Hallmarks of such a relationship would include the commencement of direct airline flights between American cities and Tehran; the granting of entry permits for citizens of each country to visit the other; and most significantly, high-level diplomatic dialogue regarding Iran’s nuclear ambitions.

Jarrett, however, has no experience whatsoever in international negotiations. Her major area of expertise has been to help President Obama “fundamentally transform” the United States into a socialist paradise. Toward that end, for instance, Jarrett helped recruit to the Administration such luminaries as the self-identified communist revolutionary Van Jones (as green jobs czar), the Alinskyite radical Mark Lloyd (as chief diversity officer within the Federal Communications Commission), and the die-hard advocate of wealth redistribution Cass Sunstein (as regulatory czar). But for the task of striking a bargain with the America-hating Islamic supremacists in Iran, it is difficult to identify any qualifications Jarrett posesses apart from the fact that she was born in that country and lived there till age 5. Jarrett’s weak resumé in that regard might well explain not only why the Administration tried so hard to keep a lid on her talks with Iranian leaders, but also why Obama refused to back Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu’s call for a clearly defined “red line” beyond which Iran’s nuclear program would not be permitted to progress. Continue reading